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International Webinar - How to obtain evidence of vertical transmission in viral infected pregnant women: Reflection on COVID-19 epidemic

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Conférencier : Prof. Hou Wei
Date de l'événement : jeudi 28 mai 2020 14:00 - 16:00

In this 6th edition, we will focus on the following theme: "How do we get evidence of vertical transmission in pregnant women infected with the virus?"

14:00 - 15:10 - Part 1: Oral presentation

  • General introduction of E-learning COVID-19 extra session
  • Welcome speeches and prospects for collaboration
  • Presentation: "How to obtain evidence of vertical transmission in pregnant women infected with the virus?" Presentation by Prof. Hou Wei, Faculty of Medicine, Wuhan University, China

15:10 - 15:50 Part 2:  Discussion moderated by Dr Stéphanie Kreis (Assistant Prof., Uni.lu) and Dr Jean Claude Schmit (Director of Health, MS)

  • Theme of the discussion : "COVID-19 Coronavirus and Pregnancy: Research and Clinical Aspects"

Link to the Webinar: 

 

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About the speaker

Prof. Wei Hou is Vice Dean at Wuhan University, Faculty of Medicine (China). 

" My research interests are innate immunity and viral infections, with an emphasis on studying the interactions between host cell innate immunity and HIV/Hantavirus infections. My current research focuses on understanding the role of antiviral factors and mechanisms involved in HIV or Hantavirus infection/replication. I am also interested in drugs of abuse and HIV infection. My team use in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo models to directly address the question of whether drugs of abuse (Opioids and methamphetamine) have the ability to suppress host immune responses and promote HIV diseases. In addition, in collaboration with the investigators at Center for Animal Experiment of Wuhan University where there is an animal biosafety laboratory, my team has established animal models such as non-human primate model for HIV and mouse model for Hantavirus infection. Using these models, they are now exploring the potential of innate immunity activation-based therapy for the treatment of HIV or Hantavirus diseases.

Our recent work on small RNA networks regulating HIV replication and infection (Front Cell Infect Microbiol), anti-HIV factor MxB nuclear entry mechanism (in press, Virol Sin), and seasonal influenza virus and vaccination effects (Virol Sin) have been accepted and published online. During the COVID-19 pandemic, the established viral nucleic acid detection method was used with support of diagnosis-related clinical departments to investigate 1) whether there is a mother-to-child vertical transmission route (Lancet) for pregnant women with the COVID-19 infection, to observe 2) some dynamic indicators of patients suffered from COVID-19 pneumonia with cardiovascular disease complications (J Med Virol), to investigate 3) the sequence of early unknown viral pneumonia pathogens (Emerg Microb Infect), etc."

For other related work, please refer to the following web pages: